Plug&Charge: What is still missing for the breakthrough

Plug&Charge: What is still missing for the breakthrough

In the coming year, more and more charging stations will be Plug&Charge-capable. To achieve this, many steps have been necessary behind the scenes in recent years - groundwork from which everyone should now benefit. But one thing is still missing for the technology to be used on a broad scale: a large number of Plug&Charge-capable cars.

Yes, it is once again Tesla that is showing the way. Simply plug the cable into the car at a Supercharger and the charging process begins automatically and is also billed without any further intervention by the user. Tesla has a big advantage: The proprietary solution only has to be able to communicate and bill between Tesla vehicles and Tesla charging stations. The fact that other vehicles can also charge at the CCS Superchargers in principle was demonstrated this year during an interim software glitch. However, nothing was billed there.

The development of Plug&Charge was a "joint industry effort," as Dr. Susanne Koblitz, Head of Charging Technology at Ionity, points out in an interview with electrive.net. It was "not a solo effort by a few companies that developed a proprietary solution for themselves." Instead, an open system was worked out jointly by charging point operators (CPO), roaming network operators, the charging network providers (EMP), charging station manufacturers and carmakers. "We built a certificate system as part of Plug&Charge that partners can use to authenticate each other," Koblitz says. "The important thing is that these chains and communication systems are now set up - if someone new comes on board, they can benefit from this system from now on." New participants should be able to dock onto this system easily - regardless of whether they are an OEM, CPO or EMP.